Burdock, Lilies, and Dulse, Veggie Soup Delight

Made a nice, warm, and healthy soup recently, using burdock, dried lilies, and dulse.
What is dulse? you may ask. It is an edible seaweed found just north of us on the Northeastern Canadian coast. My friend, who hails from that area, gave me a generous dried bag full, and loves to eat it just like that, crunchy as a snack. I wondered how it would taste heated in an Asian inspired soup.

So onto burdock, which is my latest go to root vegetable. I usually boil it, add some rice vinegar, sesame oil, and fresh grated ginger, and let it set for a few minutes while I move on to something else. You can eat it cold, (I make a slaw type salad out of it with shredded carrots, soy sprouts, broccoli, etc.), or even in sushi. For that, you have to go to Ranzan, in Providence, RI.

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Burdock root, peeled…
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…and then boiled for about 10 minutes.

In this case, I just use one big pot, and cook the burdock first, as it is quite hard. I like my burdock a bit on the crunchy side, so let it boil a bit more if you like it softer.
Dried flowers are something I like to have in the house, great for soups like this, (or even added to some sauteed bitter greens). Add when you can just about stick your fork through the burdock.  The dulse will cook the quickest, so I save this for last. If you prefer tofu, throw it in at the last minute as well. You do not want spongy tofu, unless, you do want spongy tofu.

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Dried Chinese lilies, which I bought at P & R in Chelmsford  You can also find  fresh burdock there as well.
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Dulse, from NE Canada,

It’s quite simple, actually, just let all the above ingredients simmer, while you add in what spices you like. I usually add fresh ginger, garlic, a bit of sesame oil, soy sauce, more rice vinegar, and Chinese ground pepper to taste. The flavors of the ginger and garlic will be stronger when you add them in later.

Noodles were cooked separately, the soup poured over them.  If you want your noodles to absorb the flavors, I suggest cooking them in the soup, but do so before you add the dulse.

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Enjoy!

Tuesday’s Bread

I wanted to share a recipe with you today, but realizing many are without power, thought that would be impractical and inappropriate. So, on that note, here is a link to a great bakery in Providence, RI. If you find yourself in Providence this week, please visit Seven Stars Bakery.
A RI fixture, this bakery is like no other in their delicious goods and great customer service.

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Photo by Seven Stars

I miss their coffee, and warm atmosphere, with the buzz of the loyal crowds chatting away, at their East Side location. Check them out!
PS: A little trivia, this bakery was used in a movie, featuring an “Office” worker and well known French actress…do you know what it is?

 

A New Kasa for 2011

Write what you know.  That’s what we learned in English class, right?
So I will share what I learned about the word “kasa“:

It means housekeeping in Korean, phonetically, that is.
Yet, ironically, it can refer to a form of Korean poetry as well, (gasa).

It also is a village in Sweden, a former kingdom of Senegal, a type of Japanese hat, and a well received Indian restaurant in the Castro neighborhood of San Fran, which looks delicious, among other things.

My kasa is a collection of handmade and vintage fabrics that I inherited from a family owned shop. A shop that served the East Side of Providence for well over 30 years. A shop that is now closed, but still cherished.

Although it’s noble to carry on the tradition, I did a little Korean “kasa” of my own, mentally at least!  Instead of pushing and pulling the weight of a family dynasty into 2011, I cleaned up house. I sat and organized all the cloths, handmade pillowcases, kimonos, and tapestries into neat little piles. After donating some to very good causes, I decided that a new audience deserves to bring these one of a kind pieces into their own homes.
Whether they wear it, hang it, or just admire it, let a wider neighborhood across the worldwide web get their hands on some tactile delights. So here is kasawonderful.

Of course, I will not inundate this blahg with just kasawonderful stuff. So I will share what I know.
And write less 😉